blasianxbri:

bitchytbh:

having “feelings” is ruining my reputation of being a heartless bitch 

TBH

aureks:

onezia:

luximy:

shoutout to Sam for letting me paint a sunset on him

i freaking love this omg can i have a boy who will let me be his canvas omg please

amaziing
sbrulestheworld:

gradstudentnetwork:

I know some people like to fly this flag. Most often I hear the argument that “Its about heritage NOT hate.” Well, what heritage are you displaying? I suppose you could argue the “heritage” as this image of the southern belles, southern gentlemen, a world stepped in traditions and grandeur. A time when the south stood tall - a Camelot long gone as the result of the Civil War — but then I want you to ask, on whose backs was that fantasy built? 
This flag represents southern belles, gentlemen, plantations and a glorious southern cities, all of which profited from slave labor. This flag represents an idea and a system where only certain people had rights and privileges. It was a time when many of you reading this could have owned me. You could have raped me and been within your rights as an owner. You could rip me away from my mother and sold me, and been within your rights. You could have beat me until my back was raw, and been within your rights. You could have pulled my children out of my hands and sold them, and been within your rights. You could have killed me. And then your biggest upset would be your loss of property and revenue. That is how much I would have been worth in this “Old South”. There would be no protests. I would have just been another dead n*gger. 
 It still boggles me that people defend this flag and fly it as “heritage”, and to me it displays an ignorance and blinded privilege towards a dark history. When I see this flag being flown, I do not see “Southern Pride”, I see an auction block, lynch mobs and a noose. As a black person, I wonder if I am really in a safe place.

brinting this out and handing these out to people i see fly this flag
Please, I want so badly for good things to happen. Sylvia Plath, 10 January 1953, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath (via lifeinpoetry)

(via avideur)

tyrades:

this makes me feel things